Michael Kors Became A Billionaire Today

CFDA Karolina Kurkova Michael KorsAndrew H. Walker/Getty Michael Kors (left) became a billionaire Tuesday.

Designer Michael Kors Outlet became a billionaire Tuesday as shares of his namesake company surged more than 18% to $90.68 after posting better-than-expected profit.

The 54-year-old CEO owns about 2% of the luxury goods company, which is valued at about $390 million, and he has collected more than $700 million selling stock since its 2011 initial public offering, Bloomberg reports.

The company”s stock was surging Tuesday on news that its fiscal third-quarter profit jumped 77%, driven by sales growth in Europe and North America.

European same-store sales increased 73% in the third quarter while North American sales grew 24%, the company said.

Michael Kors has revised its 2014 profit outlook to a maximum $3.09 earnings per share, up from November”s estimate of $2.77 to $2.81 earnings per share.

Michael Kors Outlet knows how to take a theme and run with it

  •  Nicole Phelps
  • February 18, 2009

Michael Kors Outlet knows how to take a theme and run with it. One season it”s Ali MacGraw”s 1970″s; more recently it was Mad Men. But for Fall, it”s not about a movie, or a TV show; it”s about…real life. In his program notes, Kors riffed about “neo-classics,” and on the runway there were clothes for corporate boardroom types, anchorwomen, and plenty of other gals for whom real life involves rocking a black fur sleeveless coat from time to time.

Tailoring was a focus. As if to prove that he can sniff out a trend, the designer tossed in a few jackets of the sort that have been making the rounds this week—some short-sleeved with squared-off, tucked shoulders; others with cutouts around the lapels. But Kors was at his strongest when he was thinking sleek: elongating, stretch gabardine cigarette trousers; a pantsuit almost as narrow as the chalk stripes on its charcoal flannel; double-face peacoats and balmacaans.

In a nod to the prevailing mood, he skipped long dresses entirely, favoring knee-grazing, one-shoulder numbers in matte sequins. Kors also thumbed his nose at the global gods of finance, whipping up shredded fox jackets and coats in neon pink, caution orange, and acid green. Those may be pretty hard to rationalize on a need basis. But as this savvy designer knows, that will make a certain type of woman want one all the more.Read more from: https://www.kalakendra.org/upcoming-events/

Madonna and Lady Gaga may have been on the soundtrack

  • Nicole Phelps
  • September 16, 2009

Madonna and Lady Gaga may have been on the soundtrack, but Michael Kors” show was decidedly not meant for the pants-less set. Explaining that he was thinking about architectural shapes, he sent out a sleek collection that, save for a few missteps, played like an ode to the city in springtime, along with its high-powered inhabitants. The strong yet rounded shoulders of his jackets and vests put the power in power suit. Overall, though, he was more interested in sleeveless shift dresses, a favorite of his most high-profile client of all, Michelle Obama. They came in silver crinkle lamé, crushed techno taffeta, draped jersey, and glove leather, but the most interesting was a radzimir number in sky blue with origamilike folds. Kors created surface interest elsewhere with zipper accents that zigzagged around the torso of a mint green asymmetric-neckline sheath, or with bold cutouts that exposed a flash of rib on a cocktail dress.

Occasionally, Kors” enthusiasm got the better of him. Dresses with graphic plastic insets might pinch, were some gal to wear them longer than it takes to make a circuit of the runway. And a further detour into deconstruction and high concept—via cashmere knits with slashes at necklines and hems, along with a trio of sweaters with extra sleeves—was off-key. But the show ended on a high note, with a pair of trompe-l”oeil sequined dresses, their graphic shapes evoking a nighttime skyline.Read more from: https://www.kalakendra.org/upcoming-events/

Here are the three steps we took to lock in our very first clients

We didn’t have a website or business cards, and we definitely didn’t have case studies to show prospective clients. Nevertheless, we were able to secure deals, develop our brand, and grow into a team of 15 people with offices in New York and Boulder.

Here are the three steps we took to lock in our very first clients:

Be open minded, prepared and enthusiastic.?Attracting customers to a brand-new startup takes a little preparation and a ton of cheerleading — you’ve got to be open-minded, collaborative and the biggest brand ambassador your company has. To start an agency in the digital space, we knew we would need someone with programming skills, but also knew we couldn’t afford to hire anyone. We quickly connected with a talented college student who put together a company website and business cards in return for being our go-to guy for design and development projects.

We spent our early days telling everyone we knew or met about our new company. In fact, the first client we had was someone who was sitting next to me at the poker table, and our second client was someone I got paired up with for a round of golf! In both cases, I continued to be outspoken about what we were doing, why we were qualified and how we could help their businesses.

Don’t be afraid to work for free, at first. We also made it nearly impossible for someone to say no to our time, thanks to our prices. We were getting our foot in the door by offering our services for next to nothing, and occasionally working for free to build case studies. We let our work speak for itself and, to this day, generate almost all of our new business through word of mouth.

There are tons of articles out there about raising your prices and making sure not to discount what you are doing, and for the most part, I agree. But when you are starting out, the most important thing is to get your product out there and get people to start referring you. If that means working for free in the beginning, do it. The most successful business people didn’t start out locking in million-dollar deals. They started small, worked extremely hard and slowly scaled up the size of their deals over time.

Learn the difference between price and value. Price is what someone pays for something, value is what someone gets out of what they pay for. As our company grew, we decided to discount our services for specific valuable customers who could help us grow through referrals and case studies. About one year into our business, a professional sports team that was referred to us got in touch. The team wanted to work with us, but had zero dollars allocated for social media marketing (keep in mind, this was 2008). After thinking long and hard, we told them that we wanted to work with them, regardless of the payment terms.

We looked at all of this “free” work as an investment, which in turn became one of the best decisions we’ve made. Working with this reputable team in the sports industry enabled us to advertise our relationship with them and has led to many other teams calling about our services, a few of which turned into paying customers. Ultimately, upper management recognized that social media was driving revenue, and each year since they have increased the budget put towards our services.

Jason Mitchell is a founding partner of Movement Strategy, a premiere social media and digital marketing company. Established in 2008, the company has quickly grown to work with some of the biggest brands including the NY Knicks and Rangers, Nickelodeon, NBA, Thrillist, Adidas, Michael Kors Outlet and many others.

The?Young Entrepreneur Council?(YEC) is an invite-only nonprofit organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. The YEC recently published?#FixYoungAmerica: How to Rebuild Our Economy and Put Young Americans Back to Work (for Good), a book of 30+ proven solutions to help end youth unemployment.

photo by: _tar0_

Read more posts on Young Entrepreneur Council ?

Young Entrepreneur Council

Five years ago, my business partner and I were fresh out of college with nothing but an idea. We knew that we had more insight on social media than the “adults” running ad agencies, which led us to start an agency that specialized in social media marketing.

We didn’t have a website or business cards, and we definitely didn’t have case studies to show prospective clients. Nevertheless, we were able to secure deals, develop our brand, and grow into a team of 15 people with offices in New York and Boulder.

Here are the three steps we took to lock in our very first clients:

Be open minded, prepared and enthusiastic.?Attracting customers to a brand-new startup takes a little preparation and a ton of cheerleading — you’ve got to be open-minded, collaborative and the biggest brand ambassador your company has. To start an agency in the digital space, we knew we would need someone with programming skills, but also knew we couldn’t afford to hire anyone. We quickly connected with a talented college student who put together a company website and business cards in return for being our go-to guy for design and development projects.

We spent our early days telling everyone we knew or met about our new company. In fact, the first client we had was someone who was sitting next to me at the poker table, and our second client was someone I got paired up with for a round of golf! In both cases, I continued to be outspoken about what we were doing, why we were qualified and how we could help their businesses.

Don’t be afraid to work for free, at first. We also made it nearly impossible for someone to say no to our time, thanks to our prices. We were getting our foot in the door by offering our services for next to nothing, and occasionally working for free to build case studies. We let our work speak for itself and, to this day, generate almost all of our new business through word of mouth.

There are tons of articles out there about raising your prices and making sure not to discount what you are doing, and for the most part, I agree. But when you are starting out, the most important thing is to get your product out there and get people to start referring you. If that means working for free in the beginning, do it. The most successful business people didn’t start out locking in million-dollar deals. They started small, worked extremely hard and slowly scaled up the size of their deals over time.

Learn the difference between price and value. Price is what someone pays for something, value is what someone gets out of what they pay for. As our company grew, we decided to discount our services for specific valuable customers who could help us grow through referrals and case studies. About one year into our business, a professional sports team that was referred to us got in touch. The team wanted to work with us, but had zero dollars allocated for social media marketing (keep in mind, this was 2008). After thinking long and hard, we told them that we wanted to work with them, regardless of the payment terms.

We looked at all of this “free” work as an investment, which in turn became one of the best decisions we’ve made. Working with this reputable team in the sports industry enabled us to advertise our relationship with them and has led to many other teams calling about our services, a few of which turned into paying customers. Ultimately, upper management recognized that social media was driving revenue, and each year since they have increased the budget put towards our services.

Jason Mitchell is a founding partner of Movement Strategy, a premiere social media and digital marketing company. Established in 2008, the company has quickly grown to work with some of the biggest brands including the NY Knicks and Rangers, Nickelodeon, NBA, Thrillist, Adidas, Michael Kors Outlet and many others.

The?Young Entrepreneur Council?(YEC) is an invite-only nonprofit organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. The YEC recently published?#FixYoungAmerica: How to Rebuild Our Economy and Put Young Americans Back to Work (for Good), a book of 30+ proven solutions to help end youth unemployment.

photo by: _tar0_

Read more posts on Young Entrepreneur Council ?

Michael Kors opened its biggest store ever, and it includes menswear

the most expensive zip code in the country, 10065, new york city, upper east side, michael korsMeredith Galante/Business InsiderAnother Michael Kors Outlet shop in New York City.

Michael

Kors’ new retail space in SoHo is, without a doubt, one of the biggest milestones for the label.

Not only is it the label’s largest store in the world—spanning 22,000 square feet across three stories—but it is also the first store to feature its full menswear line and the first-ever in-store presentation of men’s shoes.

Located at 520 Broadway, the new shop features distinctive design elements throughout each section. The 4,000-square-foot mens department has chevron flooring in gray oak with a white marble border, black leather wall coverings, custom stainless steel fixtures with gray smoked mirrors, and gray marble display units. Rounding out the sharp look are black-and-white photographs, a Richard Serra painting, and custom seating.

“I”m very excited to be opening our largest store in the world, and to have it be in SoHo,” Kors said in a statement. “New York City is my home and the source of so much of my inspiration as a designer. It’s a thrill to be able to offer my customers here such an amazing shopping experience.”

Michael KorsFacebook/Michael KorsAn example of Michael Kors Outlet menswear.

In addition to the mens offerings, the space will also feature an entire floor solely dedicated to accessories, as well as the largest assortment of MICHAEL Michael Kors ready-to-wear and footwear in the world.

Basically think of it as your one-stop shop for all your luxe needs.

Check out images from the new space below. If you’re outside the NYC area, you can shop Michael Kors’ current collections at its online store.

More from Complex:

The First Ever Instagram Ad is a Plug for Michael Kors

Anna Wintour Compares Herself and Michael Kors Outlet to Beyoncé and Jay Z

Michael Kors Delivers a Clinic on How to Do The Luxe Cozy Boy Look with Ease

Michael Kors Tops the Most Searched Fashion Brands of 2012 According to Bing

Michael Kors Loves His Rap Co-Signs But Thinks They’re Too Dirty for the Runway

Read the original article on Complex. Follow Complex on Facebook. Copyright 2015. Follow Complex on Twitter.

Read more: http://mk.luckbagsoutlet.com

I go to Asia every year for Christmas,

  •  Laird Borrelli
  • June 2, 2009

“I go to Asia every year for Christmas, but I”ve never acknowledged it [in my designs],” said Michael Kors. “Now I am.” That explained this Resort collection”s batik prints, built-in sarongs, and bamboo satin jacquard cheongsam. The seventies, however, seemed a stronger influence. Jersey dresses, wraps, and slouchy karate pants recalled the urban, disco-fied glory days of the Studio 54 era. But whatever the inspiration, this was Kors in pragmatic mode. “What keeps it Resort,” he observed, “is that everything is packable.”Read more from: https://www.kalakendra.org/upcoming-events/